Sat, Aug 13, 2022

Why We Need CCS, Part 1: The Basics

This five-part article will outline the primary reasons why CO2 capture and storage (CCS) should form an important part of the global energy mix over the 21st century. In contrast to most advocacy pieces, however, no arguments for technology-forcing policies such as feed-in tariffs or deployment mandates will be presented.

Duke completes world’s largest IGCC plant

DUKE ENERGY’s 618 MW IGCC plant, the world’s largest, began final testing and commercial operation this summer at Edwardsport, Ind. About 150 Boilermakers from Local 374 (Hammond, Ind.) and other lodges contributed their skills to the $3.5 billion project.

IGCC, or integrated gasification combined cycle, is an advanced technology that converts coal to a synthesis gas and strips out pollutants before it is combusted in a gas turbine. Exhaust heat from the combustion is then used to power steam turbines for additional electricity production.

EPA rules will not effectively impact world climate

Global collaboration on CCS technology is key to containing CO2

THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT has largely succeeded in vilifying coal usage in America’s power generation systems through their strategic and political alliances, legal challenges and media campaigns. They have a powerful voice and a strong commitment to their cause. Even so, it appears that they have become so consumed with their narrow effort to kill coal in America that they've lost sight of what it will really take to rein in the world’s CO2 emissions.

Boilermakers help build world’s largest solar thermal facility

L-92 leads critical work at innovative Ivanpah Valley project

RISING FROM THE floor of California’s Mojave Desert, about 40 miles southwest of Las Vegas, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System’s three 459-foot towers resemble missile launch pads. They are the most visible features of a 3,600-acre development that will use focused sunlight to turn water to steam and steam to electricity.

$14 billion Plant Vogtle gets green light for reactors

THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY Commission (NRC) on Feb. 9 approved the first licenses to build nuclear reactors in the United States in more than 30 years – and much of the skilled labor involved will go to union Boilermakers.

Boilermakers help build first U.S. ultra-supercritical unit

Cutting-edge Turk Plant uses less coal and water, reduces emissions

THE FIRST-EVER commercially-deployed, ultra-supercritical power generation unit in the United States is under construction in southwest Arkansas — and Boilermakers are playing a leading role in the project.

The $2.1 billion, 600-MW J. W. Turk Jr. Plant will feature the latest environmental controls, according to majority owner Southwestern Electric Power Company (SWEPCO), an American Electric Power (AEP) operating company.

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