Sat, May 25, 2019

No deal for Green New Deal

“Such an upheaval would throw millions out of work or push them into retraining for other jobs envisioned by the proposal — assuming those jobs existed in sufficient quantity — that may not pay as much or offer the same level of benefits.”

Britain must commit to carbon capture to meet climate goals: lawmakers

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain must commit to projects to capture, store and use carbon dioxide emissions to meet its climate targets, a report from a cross-party group of lawmakers said on Thursday.

The report comes ahead of a recommendation due next week on whether and how the government could strengthen its climate target to a goal of net zero emissions, by Britain’s independent climate advisers, the Committee on Climate Change.

Richardton ethanol plant moves forward with carbon capture project

A project to capture carbon dioxide from a western North Dakota ethanol plant continues to advance as researchers work to better understand the geology below the facility.

Red Trail Energy in Richardton proposes to capture carbon dioxide rather than emit it into the atmosphere and inject it deep underground, reducing the carbon footprint of the ethanol plant to meet West Coast fuel standards.

Storing CO2 underground could help the fight against climate change

Despite the emergence of renewable energy sources such as large-scale wind and solar power, our planet is still heavily reliant on fossil fuels.

In the U.S., for example, the Energy Information Administration states that petroleum, natural gas and coal accounted for roughly 77.6 percent of primary energy production in 2017.

It's within this context that, in some quarters, the idea of carbon capture and storage, or CCS, has gained traction.

The devil's in the details: Policy implications of 'clean' vs. 'renewable' energy

In the wake of several major climate reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the U.S. Government, climate change has taken center stage in American political discourse, encapsulated by — but in no way limited to — the Green New Deal. Many of the proposed plans for confronting the climate crisis stress the imperative of decreasing emissions by transitioning to 100% "clean" or "renewable" sources of energy.

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