Mon, Nov 18, 2019

Occidental CEO calls for new U.S. laws to boost carbon capture

CHICAGO — Occidental Petroleum Corp plans to shift toward a carbon-neutral production model, it chief executive said on Thursday, but new U.S. laws are needed to support technologies designed to fight global warming.

Occidental, which recently purchased oil producer Anadarko Petroleum in $38 billion deal, is advancing its use of technologies to capture carbon, and prevent the element from escaping into the atmosphere.

Climate change: Electrical industry's 'dirty secret' boosts warming

It's the most powerful greenhouse gas known to humanity, and emissions have risen rapidly in recent years, the BBC has learned.

Sulphur hexafluoride, or SF6, is widely used in the electrical industry to prevent short circuits and accidents.

But leaks of the little-known gas in the UK and the rest of the EU in 2017 were the equivalent of putting an extra 1.3 million cars on the road.

Climate solutions should (and can) save our planet and our jobs

The urgency to mitigate climate change has pushed many to propose radical alterations to how humans exist on the planet. Some see the rapid abandonment of fossil fuels as essential to climate goals. This opinion certainly is at the core of the Green New Deal proposed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY 14th) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) earlier this year – and supported by some Democratic presidential candidates.

NEWS Selective graphene membranes could invigorate carbon capture technology

Scientists have developed membranes that separate carbon dioxide from nitrogen. The membranes feature porous graphene decorated with polymers and use interactions between the polymers and carbon dioxide to create a system that can selectively filter carbon dioxide out of flue gas.

Carbon capture and storage remains one of the most promising strategies to limit the impact of carbon emissions. Some industrial plants already capture carbon dioxide using amine sorbents, where heating regenerates the amines and removes the carbon dioxide – but this process is energy intensive.

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