Sun, Jul 15, 2018

CCUS gains wider acceptance as climate change solution

CAPTURING AND USING carbon dioxide as a way to mitigate climate change has for decades been broadly dismissed by many climate activists, environmental groups, scientists and government officials as expensive, impractical and unnecessary.

That mindset is finally beginning to change markedly, thanks to advances in technology and the growing realization that renewables alone cannot solve the climate problem.

Audubon Joins Carbon Capture Coalition

NEW YORK — “Audubon is committed to protecting birds and the places they need — and the greatest threat to birds and people is climate change,” said David Yarnold (@david_yarnold), president and CEO of National Audubon Society.

“While some may be holding out for a perfect solution to climate change, we know that it will take an array of approaches to reduce planet-warming pollution.

In Missouri, coal complicates the case for electric vehicle infrastructure

One of the country’s most coal-dependent utilities wants to offer electric vehicle charging station incentives.

Building electric vehicle infrastructure has emerged as a rare consensus topic for many utilities and environmentalists — a way to boost utility sales and simultaneously get oil-burning, smog-spewing cars and trucks off the road.

Should environmentalists support carbon capture?

When the Waxman-Markey bill — the most notable congressional attempt to establish a national cap-and-trade program to limit carbon emissions — was introduced in 2009, it received opposition from both sides of the aisle.

On the left, there was surprising pushback from some environmental groups who argued the bill didn’t go far enough to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

Maybe we can afford to suck CO2 out of the sky after all

While avoiding the worst dangers of climate change will likely require sucking carbon dioxide out of the sky, prominent scientists have long dismissed such technologies as far too expensive.

But a detailed new analysis published today in the journal Joule finds that direct air capture may be practical after all.

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