Wed, Aug 15, 2018

Maybe we can afford to suck CO2 out of the sky after all

While avoiding the worst dangers of climate change will likely require sucking carbon dioxide out of the sky, prominent scientists have long dismissed such technologies as far too expensive.

But a detailed new analysis published today in the journal Joule finds that direct air capture may be practical after all.

How Oman’s Rocks Could Help Save the Planet

The rocks here in Oman are special, this scientist says. They remove planet-warming carbon dioxide from the air and turn it to stone. In theory, these rocks could store hundreds of years of human emissions of CO2. Storing even a fraction of that would not be easy. But it’s not impossible.

Reimagine CO2

INSPIRING THE BRIGHTEST MINDS AROUND THE WORLD TO HELP SOLVE CLIMATE CHANGE.

A $20 Million global competition to develop breakthrough technologies that will convert CO₂ emissions from power plants and industrial facilities into valuable products like building materials, alternative fuels and other items that we use every day. Teams will be scored on how much CO₂ they convert and the net value of their products.

New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbon

Advancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from resources such as coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a new paper published by Idaho National Laboratory researchers.

The fuel cell design incorporates innovations in three components: the anode, the electrolyte and the fuel. Together, these advancements allow the fuel cell to utilize about three times as much carbon as earlier direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) designs.

Too Good To Be True? Carbon Capture 'Game Changer' Raises Hopes And Questions

A potential breakthrough technology is being tested in Houston—a new kind of natural-gas power plant that captures and reuses what normally goes up the smokestack: carbon dioxide, heat, and water.

If it works, NET Power’s natural-gas plant promises no carbon emissions and no water use—it produces water instead—and this is the clincher: it promises to produce electricity at a cost competitive with existing power plants.

Climate's magic rabbit: Pulling CO2 out of thin air

While CO2 concentrations are now higher than they have been in at least 800,000 years, the gas still only accounts for a tiny 0.04% of our atmosphere.

However, extracting carbon dioxide from well mixed air is not just technically difficult, it's expensive as well.

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